A&S Catagories

Faire entries are divided into one of three major categories: static arts, costuming, and performing arts. Each category has sub-categories. It is important to determine the best placement for your entry. The descriptions below give specific details about each area. For more detailed information about a specific area, please follow the links provided for each one.

Please check back here regularly for updates.

Static Arts

These are entries that can be viewed without the active participation of the entrant.

Costuming Arts

Costuming is judged on the body and requires the active participation of the entrant.

Performing Arts

These are entries that are performed before an audience and require the active partipation of the entrant.

Static Arts

An entry that can be viewed and evaluated without the active participation of the entrant at the time of adjudication. A brief description of each sub-category is listed below. Within each of the sub-categories, judges look for different things. Click on each sub-category to find its specifics.

Animal Husbandry and Horticulture : Includes the study and raising of period plants and animals .

Armor – Includes plate, leather, ring, and maille.

Bone, Horn, and Amber – Includes work with carving and inlay techniques using natural materials other than wood and stone.

Brewing and Vintning – Includes alcohol based items where the entrant creates the alcohol – beers, ales, meads, stouts, porters and wines.

Calligraphy and Illumination – Includes the creation of manuscripts on paper or parchment. Calligraphy is the actual wording on the manuscript, while illumination is any illustration on the piece.

Ceramics, Glass, and Sculpture – Includes pottery, ceramics, stained glass and sculpture in any medium. .

Children’s Open – Includes any item or activity by a child under the age of twelve. Categories follow those in the adult section. A reasonable attempt at documentation is expected. .

Cooking – Includes entrees, breads, desserts, subtleties, and cooking aids such as spice blends and condiments .

Costume Accessories – Includes items such as shoes, hats, purses, gloves, pomanders, fans, etc..

Fine Arts – Includes drawing, painting, and any sculpture whose medium is not represented in any other category

Hair Dressing and Cosmetics – Includes the creation of period hairstyles and preparations used as makeup .

Heraldic Display – Includes items used to enhance the feel and look of the SCA through the use of heraldic arms

Historical Technology – Includes experimental work in any medium. Examples include “from the ground up” projects and architectural models demonstrating period building methods .

Jewelry – Includes enameling, casting, soldered and non-soldered construction, stone cutting and polishing.

Leatherwork: Non-armor – Includes tooled work, constructed leather, and cobbling.

Metalwork: Non-armor – Includes constructed pieces, casting, chasing and repousse, cold forging and hot forging .

Miscellaneous – This is only to be used if the entry truly fits no other category. Every attempt will be made to place a miscellaneous entry into another category before it is considered eligible for this category. An entry can only be placed in this category with the permission of the person in charge of the Faire. For Kingdom A&S, this will be the Kingdom A&S Minister.

Printing Sciences – Includes printmaking, paper making, inks, paints, pigments, pens, and brushes.

SCA Life (OPEN ONLY): – Items that, while not documentably period, enhance the overall experience of the SCA. Some examples would be a heraldic cooler cover, tissue paper stained glass windows, or a fighter waterer disguised as a duck; the limit is your imagination.

Stillroom Arts– Includes candles, soaps, natural dyes, infused vinegar and oils, and cordials.

Textile Arts: Application – Refers to the end process of textile work, how the textile components were actually used. For example, an embroidery or a printed cloth. Includes embroidery, lace making, fabric decoration, and beadwork.

Textile Arts: Construction– Refers to the actual construction process of textile work, how the textiles were made. For example, tablet weaving, knitting, and woven cloth. Includes spinning, weaving, knitting, and sprang .

Woodworking– Includes constructed pieces, furniture, musical instruments, and treen (useful objects carved of wood, such as spoons or combs).

Writing: Creative – Includes poetry, prose, and musical composition that is not performed. All writing categories must be entered no later than 4 weeks prior the the Annual Kingdom Arts and Sciences Faire.

Writing: Research Papers – Includes all types of research paper including scholarly works, how-to papers and historical reviews. All writing categories must be entered no later than 4 weeks prior the the Annual Kingdom Arts and Sciences Faire.

Writing: Anotated Bibliographies – An annotated bibliography includes all the background research that would allow someone to produce a project. It is a project in-a-box. A beginner should be able to use an annotated bibliography as an armchair director that would allow him or her to produce the actual item. In other words, an annotated bibliography is the research package. All writing categories must be entered no later than 4 weeks prior the the Annual Kingdom Arts and Sciences Faire.

Costuming Arts

Costuming does not fit easily into either the static arts or the performing arts. It combines elements of both of these art forms. Within each of the sub-categories, judges look for different things. Click on each sub-category to find its specifics.

Costume Review : Early Period European (Pre-1400) – Includes modeled garments constructed using period techniques that would have been found in Europe during the years up to 1400 AD

Costume Review : Late Period European (Post-1400) – Includes modeled garments constructed using period techniques that would have been found in Europe during the years between 1400 and 1600 AD.

Costume Review : Non-European – Includes modeled garments constructed using period techniques that would have been found outside of Europe in any period up to 1600 AD.

Performing Arts

Performing Arts covers any kind of performing art, including dance, music, and theatrical works.. In performing arts, the artisan is judged on both the performance itself and its authenticity. Props such as garb, puppets, instruments, etc., may be entered in static.

For all Performing Arts categories, performances are limited to 15 minutes, including introduction.

Within each of the sub-categories, judges look for different things. Click on each sub-category to find its specifics.

Bardic Recitation – Includes poetry recitation and story telling.

Combined Musical Performance – Solo – Includes a performance which combines both vocal and instrumental components by one person.

Combined Musical Performance – Duet – Includes a performance which combines both vocal and instrumental components by two people.

Combined Musical Performance – Group – Includes a performance which combines both vocal and instrumental components by more than two people.

Dance – European – Solo or Duo – Includes all dances for one or two people which would have been performed in Europe any time prior to 1600 AD, and original choreography that conveys that style of dance.

Dance – European – Group – Includes all dances for more than two people which would have been performed in Europe any time prior to 1600 AD, and original choreography that conveys that style of dance.

Dance – Non-European – Solo – Includes all dances for one person which would have been performed outside of Europe any time prior to 1600 AD, and original choreography that conveys that style of dance.

Dance – Non-European – Group – Includes all dances for more than one person which would have been performed outside of Europe any time prior to 1600 AD, and original choreography that conveys that style of dance.

Dramatic Performance – Solo – Includes any theatrical performance which would have been seen any time prior to 1600 AD, and original theatrical works that convey a period style of theater performed by one person.

Dramatic Performance – Group – Includes any theatrical performance which would have been seen any time prior to 1600 AD, and original theatrical works that convey a period style of theater performed by more than one person.

Instrumental Performance – Solo – Includes a performance which contains only instrumental components by one person.

Instrumental Performance – Duet – Includes a performance which contains only instrumental components by two people.

Instrumental Performance – Group – Includes a performance which contains only instrumental components by more than two people.

Live Arts – Includes activities conducted prior to 1600 that were not primarily practiced as performances and that had no physical “end product” ie: the activity is an end unto itself. This can include, but is not restricted to, martial activities, exercises, and games.

Street Performance – Solo – Includes juggling, tumbling, street magic and sleight of hand performed by one person.

Street Performance – Group – Includes juggling, tumbling, street magic and sleight of hand performed by more than one person.

Vocal Performance – Solo – Includes a performance which contains only vocal components by one person.

Vocal Performance – Duet – Includes a performance which contains only vocal components by two people.

Vocal Performance – Group – Includes a performance which contains only vocal components by more than two people.